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trying to replace the sequester. the cuts have enemies on both sides of the aisle. democrats don't like cuts to head start and meals on wheels. republicans don't like the cuts to defense, which military leaders argued hurt the readiness of the armed forces. just ask former secretary robert gates. >> there may be a more stupid way to cut the budget than sequestration. if there is, i have not been able to identify it. these across the board mindless cuts that make no difference between what is important and what's unimportant is a crazy way to try and deal with the budget issue. >> so, can congress find a way to fix it or is washington's dysfunction destined to doom this effort as well? let's bring in two exerts. john avalon and my friend from cnn money. i appreciate you joining me. i hope it is better this time around. to you, john, sequester was supposed to be the poison pill. what about this time? >> that is right. every time we set out the self-imposed markers designed to scare congress, they have been managed to blow past it. the impulse to charge into the bayonette was a super fail.
to change the president's legacy? >>> john king, don peebles, member of president obama's national finance committee. john, let me start with you. president obama's poll numbers hiing new lows, just over three years -- three years from the end of his run. can he reverse this? >> can he reverse it, christine? >> absolutely. >> can you see a clear path for him to reverse it? no. for a number reasons. you mentioned his personal approval rating is at the lowest point of his presidency. also people are in a lousy mood about washington. some of it's the government shutdown, some of it's the rollout of obama care. the president would need partners to reverse it, to get things done. paul ryan who he's negotiating with, a disciple of jack kemp, he would like to work on some of these economic proposals. a lot of these tea party members come from districts that are struggling. they're behind in the recovery, if you will. so they have common interests, but christine, what they don't have is any common ground. so it's very hard to see any major new economic 234ish tifs in the short term. the president
because of the democrats and republicans don't see the minimum wage to address diversity. when you talk mostly to people about income inequity. that means we are looking 20 years out from my real change. >> the president's agenda derailed by the nightmare rollout of the affordable care web site. coming up next. the boss is apologetic. >> i'm sorry. i think everybody understands i'm not happy. >> how does a man who wanted to shutdown the government over this law feel about it? >> was it worth it? >> i continued to speak in support of defunding obama care until i am no longer to stand. >> absolutely. >> i'll take you inside and outside washington for answers next. sm no, i'm good. ♪ [ male announcer ] every time you say no to a cigarette, you celebrate a little win. nicorette mini delivers fast craving relief in just 3 minutes. double your chances of quitting with nicorette mini. ♪ [ male announcer ] united is rolling out global, satellite-fed wi-fi to connect you even 35,000 feet over the ocean. ♪ that's...wifi friendly. ♪ that's...wifi friendly. but with less energy, moodiness,
't make any sense. it makes plenty of sense if you don't think about it! really, honey, why can't you just deal with it like everybody else? because i took a pepcid®. fine. debbie, you're my new favorite. [ male announcer ] break with tradition, take pepcid® complete. it works fast and lasts. get relief from your heartburn relief with pepcid® complete. >>> israel's rereaction action nuclear deal. >> fred, i asked defense secretary straight up how worried is he if there is a u.s. led nuclear agreement with iran that it would react with military force and possibly bomb the nuclear sigtesites? >> we understand that. i think the iranians understand that. >> he insisted that the u.s. won't go for what he called a bad agreement just to have an agreement. there was plenty of scepticism about an agreement with iran and a lot of that was led by key democrats including his predecessor former defense secretary leon pannetta. >> there are a lot of concerns what is going to happen with the fuel that was developed. what is going to happen with this heavy water react tore and how is all of this going
greenwald shows the high cost of the low prices. >> they don't care about what you sacrifice. it doesn't matter how many people lose their families. it doesn't matter if the associates have good health care. it doesn't natser anything other than what the bottom-line profit is for that store of that month. >> that was 2005. now walmart executives don't do much talking. why should they? the company is making hundreds of billions of dollars this year. this week we did talk to the ceo, bill simon. he's talking about thousands of new promotions for wall mort workers. the timing is notable. this year's total is about the same as last year's for overall promotions. why the fanfare? is it to blunt the criticism that its workers are paid too little. >> that is an unfair criticism. we're very proud of the jobs that we offer as a company. at the beginning of the year i made a presentation at the national retail federation and described our plans this year for talking about and celebrating and defending our associates and our jobs. we hear from them often and they ask us to stand up for them. they
people don't know. they make it by advertising. most people don't understand that, they're actually losing money. >> rachel, you're a huge twitter user. it's helped you a lot professionally. >> and personally. >> a lot of fun on it. i'm wondering what your take is in terms of what it has done for you in your business and where the advertising needs to go. >> i've been on it since 2008. when i was on twitter i was working at the "huffington post" covering the presidential election in 2008. the first early adopters in media were on twitter. that's how i started to consume my news. i remember noticing it in the conventions in 2008, i wasn't looking at the news sites, just looking on twitter. it's become just this first line of news consumption for most people. but it's so much more than that for me personally. as an activist it helps me get my message out. as someone who likes to engage across a broad variety of industries, i can easily do so and find the common denominator. i do a lot of work around women. i can do that across every industry. >> let me ask you about advertising. i not
cost, union contracts, pension obligations, all these things that don't exist when the low-cost carrier steps in. some of the guys on the low-cost carrier are paid $28,000 as pilots. >> very big changes in how we're using our technology on airplanes. you might want to pack a parachute on your next trip if richard quest gets a hold of these. the airlines may let people use cells foik this one, well, not like this one, but it's our favorite. a survey from delta says 64% say that would have a negative impact on the flying experience. airlines would have to install equipment to let the cell phones communicate with towers on the ground, but where you hear -- [ ringing ] -- airlines may hear [ bell ] . the airlines charge us for food, baggage, for extended tickets. will they bill us for talking on this? >> y-e-s! [ laughter ] which planet were we all born on? of course they will! it's going to cost a million and a half bucks, minimum, to put the antenna in the roof for this thing to communicate. >> but it's going to cause riots. >> yes. >> it's going to cause riots! >> i mean, you ever sit on
. is that the same thing? i don't think so. you have a closed private group. not a public display. >> carly, is there an advantage that deal with the blue states and red states? howard schultz in some of the things he reached out on with bringing guns in the stores or washington getting its act together. it plays to the brand of the company. >> clearly howard feels that way. i don't think he would do this unless he thought it was consistent with his brand. my guess is he has employee within starbucks that agree with him and many who do not. he has customers who agree with him and some do not. that is the balancing act with the ceo who is out there expressing a personal opinion. it is difficult to separate their personal opinion from their job. >> let me ask you the fine line of shareholder value and personal responsibility. >> the board of starbucks and shareholders of starbucks, i think, appreciate they have a ceo who is not as bland as sand. they like that someone is out there taking the opinion. >> it is good pr. >> that is part of his makeup. you need a ceo who is front and center on is
.com. don't tough it out. knock it out! fast. [ female announcer ] only with abreva. >>> silicon valley. the future of america's hope. san quentin prison is an hour away in california. for many, it is a hopeless place until now. we have lauren siegel here with more on how the most notorious prisons in america with tech savvy entrepreneurships. >> christine, it is quickly becoming a reality. check it out. this is san quentin state prison. inmates spend 10, 20 or 30--year sentences here. some will never leave. behind bars, murderers, thieves. one that is surprising. even tremendo entrepreneurs. that's chris along with his wife, he started the program to do what many do. solve a problem. >> in california, we spend more for prisons than education. >> reporter: more than half end up back behind bars within three years. one reason, they cannot find work. >> i'm a go getter in starting my company with a vision. >> reporter: like many others in the bay area, these are becoming tech entrepreneurs. that is what the last mile is helping him do. >> i would franchise it first. >> reporter: the progr
on the field and locker room ultimately determines what you do with the rest of your life. i don't think the money will ever leave the nfl, it is such a big part of our culture, but it is important to send the right image and the nfl focuses on that relentlessly. >> i am pretty sure in the nfl no one sent a text like the one we have been hearing about and i am sure there are people, coaches and the like who are pretty upset about that. let me ask you, lee, this early tough treatment i guess when you're young, call it hazing, toughen them up, i don't know, on wall street, that's something can make somebody a leader. football it can make somebody a leader, make them better. but you can't treat your interns that way. so where is the balance? >> i think what you have to do is what we do with our interns in my experience, i had two experiences on wall street, one was positive, one horribly negative, led to me walking off the field, so to speak. i believe and condone extreme, intense mentoring. but what we do do is explain to people, explain to me when i got on wall street that this is going t
. the debate in the country, whether it's legal or illegal is something we don't participate in dine to day basis. that's something congress deals with. if they're sold in the u.s., we want them sold through formal channels rather than through gun shows. >> no matter how a gun is purchased or obtained, the gun debate has changed since last december. here's what chief correspondent christiane amanpour told me a year ago. >> this was a red line by anybody's account. these were babies. this was a biblical slaughter of the innocents. >> but talk of reform, big talk of reform, was sidelined for more pressing problems in washington. i sat down with christiane correspondent candy crowley and asked why. >> it's tragic. the president made a lot of very good speeches and made a lot of efforts but it didn't go far enough, and, look. all you have to do is look at the politicians who are worried, scared. what is the right word? about the nra. on my program we interviewed a lawmaker from tennessee who recounted chapter and verse about how she was in good standing with the nra. because she wanted a minima
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11